epistemologicalfallacy:

10 More Cool Sharks You Probably Don’t Hear Much About During Shark Week

So I know that Shark Week is over now, but I couldn’t just stop at 10, so here are 10 more!

Angel Shark (Squatina)
There are 23 different species of angel shark and all live in shallow, warm seas, though some migrate to warmer waters during the summer. Most types grow to a length of 5 ft (1.5 m). They hunt at night in their own territories. Unlike rays, they have sharp teeth for feeding on shelled prey and small fish. They disguise themselves from prey by covering their bodies in sand and often having sandy-colored skin. An angel shark is hard to see as it lies on the seabed. Its body is so flat that it appears no more than a low mound in the sand. Unlike a ray, it uses its tail rather than its large fins to swim. Read more about this shark

Australian Ghost Shark (Elephant Shark) (Callorhinchus milii)
A chimaera; their length is 2 to 4 ft (60 to 120 cm). Males of the species mature at about 2.13 ft (65 cm). The club-like projection on the snout of the ghost shark is used to search for prey. The end is covered in pores that sense movement and weak electrical fields. Ghost sharks feed primarily on shellfish and molluscs. Recently, the ghost shark was proposed as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its relatively small genome size. The genome of the ghost shark is estimated to be 910 Mb long (Mb = megabases = 1 million basepairs) which is the smallest among all the cartilaginous fishes. Recently, an Elephant Shark Genome Project has been launched to sequence the whole genome of the elephant shark. Read more about this shark

Blue Shark (Prionace glauca)
A requiem shark; the largest blue shark on record measured 12.6 ft (3.83 m) in length, but they are rumored to get as large as 20 ft (6.09 m). Blue sharks are the great travelers of the world, covering huge distances each year. They do not dive deeply for food, but hunt almost any kind of surface-living fish. They particularly like whale meat and are known to gather in “feeding frenzies” when they find a whale carcass. Blue sharks often school segregated by sex and size, and this behavior has led to their nickname “wolves of the sea”. Read more about this shark

Goblin Shark (Mitsukurina owstoni)
Grows to about 13 ft (4 m) in length. The goblin shark was first discovered off the coast of Japan over 100 years ago, yet little is known about it. Goblin sharks live in water between 330-2,300 ft (100-700 m) deep. They have sensory pores on their long snout which detect prey and their flabby body suggests an inactive lifestyle. Also known as the elfin shark. Sometimes called a “living fossil” as it is the only extant representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. Read more about this shark

Porbeagle (Lamna nasus)
A mackerel shark; reaches a maximum total length of about 12 ft (3.66 m). Porbeagle sharks prefer more temperate seas and may be seen near the British and North American coasts in summer. They are heavily built and partly warm-blooded, being able to keep their body temperature several degrees higher than surroundings. Read more about this shark

Puffadder Shyshark (Haploblepharus edwardsii)
A catshark; typically reaches 2 ft (60 cm) in length. When threatened, the puffadder shyshark (and other members of its genus) curls into a circle with its tail covering its eyes, giving rise to the local names “shyshark” and “doughnut”. It is a predator that feeds mainly on crustaceans, polychaete worms, and small bony fishes. Read more about this shark

Pyjama Shark (Poroderma africanum)
A catshark; it grows up to 3.6 ft (1.1 m) long. This abundant, bottom-dwelling species can be found from the intertidal zone to a depth of around 330 ft (100 m), particularly over rocky reefs and kelp beds. When threatened, it curls into a circle with its tail covering its head. The primarily nocturnal pyjama shark spends most of the day lying motionless, hidden in a cave or crevice among vegetation. It often forms groups, particularly during summer. Also known as the striped catshark. Read more about this shark

Sawshark (Pliotrema and Pristiophorus)
There are 7 species of sawshark; they can range up to 5.6 ft (1.7 m) in length. Sawsharks stir up the seabed with their long, toothed snout, feeling for small fish and crabs with their barbels. Baby sawsharks’ teeth are covered with skin up to the time they are born, so they don’t injure their mother or one another. Read more about this shark

Velvet Belly lanternshark (Etmopterus spinax)
A dogfish; generally no more than 18 in (45 cm) long. Lives in deep water. The velvet belly is so named because its black underside is abruptly distinct from the brown coloration on the rest of its body. Like other lanternsharks, the velvet belly is bioluminescent, with light-emitting photophores forming a species-specific pattern over its flanks and abdomen. These photophores are thought to function in counter-illumination, which camouflages the shark against predators. They may also play a role in social interactions. Read more about this shark

Zebra Shark (Stegostoma fasciatum)
A carpet shark; attains a length of 8.2 ft (2.5 m). Its long tail accounts for half its length. The zebra shark is named after the stripes that break up its shape as it lies in shallow water. The stripes make it difficult to see in shallow water. The stripes become less vivid as the shark ages. Read more about this shark

[Sources used: Wikipedia, http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Education/bioprofile.htmand Pope, J. (1997). Sharks. New York, N.Y.: DK Pub..]

(via sharkandbite)

poacheggsnotwildlife:

The reality of shark finning


Imagine how you’d feel if this were people… Now understand that each individual shark is actually, objectively, literally MORE IMPORTANT to the ecosystem than 20 humans. 50 humans. Sit here and watch them die.

poacheggsnotwildlife:

The reality of shark finning

Imagine how you’d feel if this were people… Now understand that each individual shark is actually, objectively, literally MORE IMPORTANT to the ecosystem than 20 humans. 50 humans.

Sit here and watch them die.

(via sharkandbite)

Some not-so-good-vis whalesharks from Galapagos, in honor of ! Whee!  :D

nubbsgalore:

photos by shawn heinrichs in oslob, philippines and isla mujeres, mexico. 

(via nautilus7620)

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]



Any time you’re ready, folks…….

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

Any time you’re ready, folks…….

(via wilwheaton)

all-about-the-oceans:

The Great Eggcase Hunt was established in 2003 and has been engaging the public in hunting for spent shark, skate and ray eggcases along the UK coastline ever since. Thanks to our supporters, we now have an extensive and ever expanding database of eggcase records, which continues to provide us with crucial information about the distribution of British sharks, skates and rays.

What is an eggcase? 

An eggcase, which is also known as a mermaid’s purse, is a tough leathery case that protects the embryo of a shark, skate or ray. Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature version of the adult.

There are over ten species of skate and ray, and only a few species of shark in UK waters that reproduce by laying eggcases on the seabed. Each species’ eggcase is different in shape and size, which allows us to identify them. Eggcases remain safely on the seabed until the juvenile has hatched, and then the empty eggcases often get washed up on beaches and can be found amongst the seaweed in the strandline.

Why report eggcases? 

The distribution of different shark, skate and ray species is changing and a number of species are in decline. By taking part in the Great Eggcase Hunt you can help the Shark Trust to identify areas of the coast where eggcases regularly wash up.

Reported findings allow the Trust to identify potential shark, skate and ray nursery grounds, providing valuable data that aids conservation. This process can help with the management of UK sharks, skates and rays, as well as help designate Marine Conservation Zones which should provide protection for some species from particularly damaging human activities.

Your eggcase records are a crucial element of this conservation work and it’s so easy to take part - everything you need for a successful eggcase hunt can be found on the website.

Eggcases can be found on the beach all year round, so whatever the time of year keep your eyes open. The strandline or the back of the beach are the best places to find eggcases, washed up amongst the flotsam and jetsam. For more eggcase hunting tips, click here.

Found nothing? 

Some beaches are regularly cleaned by local councils and any eggcases will have been removed along with the seaweed, whilst other beaches simply don’t have any eggcases to find. By reporting beaches without eggcases you are still contributing to the project, as this information adds an important dimension to our knowledge of eggcase distribution.

Report your eggcases! Granted, this is probably more geared to the UK, but the Pacific Coast has some critters too……

(via sharkandbite)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Excellent.

(via wilwheaton)

I’ve finally set up a page at Behance, Adobe’s creative collective of artists and other folks…. pretty cool stuff over there…..

markruffalo:

Please consider signing this important anti-Citizens United petition telling the Senate to pass a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United, which it will vote on on September 8. 

theambientartist:

Proving the very cultural points she’s been making.

I’ve just set up a little storefront at Society6. Just prints for now, but when I get some time (HA!) I want to add iFone cases, pillows, mugs, etc….. (I also need to update - or delete? - my RedBubble & CafePress stores…..)

"No one there understood why the police attacked. Before then, police hadn’t discouraged protesters from walking down Florissant Avenue. The midnight curfew was hours away. Prior to the police attack, neither I, nor anyone with whom I spoke, had seen any violation of the law. The only violence I witnessed resulted from a disproportionate and relentless assault by an unnecessarily militarized police force."

I was on the front lines of the violence in Ferguson. Militarized police caused the chaos. - The Washington Post (via wilwheaton)

(via wilwheaton)

thebrainscoop:

I’ve spent the last few weeks writing a script I’ve been dreading for years. 
The story of the Passenger Pigeon is a terrifying omen, a nightmarish slow-motion car accident unraveling in front of our eyes. Hindsight is so clear with this issue that it seems nauseatingly preventable - I say this from my position a hundred years in the future. But the reality of this story is that because of human impact, interference, over-hunting and trapshooting, within the span of 4 decades the population of these birds diminished from a booming 3.7 billion individuals to near extinction. They were shot, netted, poisoned, smoked out, burned up, prodded, intoxicated, left to starve, and otherwise eradicated in every sense of the word. It’s a tough reality to face. 
We’ll be uploading this video in a few weeks, but I wanted to give you all a heads up to check out this book by Joel Greenberg; A Feathered River Across the Sky was my primary source of information for our upcoming episode. The amount of care and attention to detail Greenberg gave in writing this work is tangible; I had to set it down on more than one occasion to catch my breath and clear my head. The toughest part of reading the book is realizing we are still doing this today, but our excess is no longer isolated to one charismatic species.
It’s time we wake up. 

What she said.

thebrainscoop:

I’ve spent the last few weeks writing a script I’ve been dreading for years. 

The story of the Passenger Pigeon is a terrifying omen, a nightmarish slow-motion car accident unraveling in front of our eyes. Hindsight is so clear with this issue that it seems nauseatingly preventable - I say this from my position a hundred years in the future. But the reality of this story is that because of human impact, interference, over-hunting and trapshooting, within the span of 4 decades the population of these birds diminished from a booming 3.7 billion individuals to near extinction. They were shot, netted, poisoned, smoked out, burned up, prodded, intoxicated, left to starve, and otherwise eradicated in every sense of the word. It’s a tough reality to face. 

We’ll be uploading this video in a few weeks, but I wanted to give you all a heads up to check out this book by Joel Greenberg; A Feathered River Across the Sky was my primary source of information for our upcoming episode. The amount of care and attention to detail Greenberg gave in writing this work is tangible; I had to set it down on more than one occasion to catch my breath and clear my head. The toughest part of reading the book is realizing we are still doing this today, but our excess is no longer isolated to one charismatic species.

It’s time we wake up. 

What she said.